204-326-6088 [email protected]

Individuals

An advisor can help you determine where you are today financially and where you want to go. An advisor can provide you guidance on how to reach your short, medium and long term financial goals.

An advisor can help you determine where you are today financially and where you want to go. An advisor can provide you guidance on how to reach your short, medium and long term financial goals.

Why work with a Financial Advisor? 

  • Worry less about money and gain control. 

  • Organize your finances. 

  • Prioritize your goals. 

  • Focus on the big picture. 

  • Save money to reach your goals.

What can a Financial Advisor help you with? 

Advisors can help you with accumulation and protection

Accumulation: 

  • Cash Management – Savings and Debt

  • Tax Planning

  • Investments

Protection: 

  • Insurance Planning

  • Health Insurance

  • Estate Planning

How do you start? 

  • Establish and define the financial advisor-client relationship.

  • Gather information about current financial situation and goals including lifestyle goals. 

  • Analyze and evaluate current financial status. 

  • Develop and present strategies and solutions to achieve goals. 

  • Implement recommendations. 

  • Monitor and review recommendations. Adjust if necessary. 

Next steps…

  • Talk to us about helping you get your finances in order so you can achieve your lifestyle and financial goals. 

  • Feel confident in knowing you have a plan to get to your goals.

Continue Reading

As our lives grow and change with variable circumstances, new additions, and job transitions, our needs for insurance will also evolve. Additionally, economic fluctuations and external circumstances that influence your insurance policy will need frequent re-evaluation to ensure that you are making the most appropriate and financially favorable decisions. Talk to us we can help.

As our lives grow and change with variable circumstances, new additions, and job transitions, our needs for insurance will also evolve. Additionally, economic fluctuations and external circumstances that influence your insurance policy will need frequent re-evaluation to ensure that you are making the most appropriate and financially favorable decisions. Perhaps you aren’t sure whether you should conduct an insurance audit or not. The following scenarios are usually a good indication that you should thoroughly assess and review your current policy contract: 

  • Bringing new life into your family? A new baby may not only prompt you to adjust your beneficiary information, but it is likely to change or influence your coverage needs.

  • Changing jobs? Probationary periods may not provide the same level of disability or accident insurance.

  • Is your policy nearing the end of its term? Be sure to compare prices for new policies as they can sometimes be more affordable as compared to renewing the current plan.

  • Has your marital status changed? Your insurance policy will likely need updating to reflect such.

The specific type of insurance policy you carry as well as personal details certainly influence coverage and premium prices, so if any of the following factors apply to you, be sure to update your policy accordingly. You might be eligible for a rate reduction. 

  • Changes to your overall risk assessment like smoking cessation, dangerous hobbies, high risk profession etc.

  • If you have experienced improvements to a previously diagnosed health condition.

  • Do your policy’s investment options still fall in line with current market conditions?

  • Have you used your insurance policy as collateral for a loan? Once that loan is paid off, collateral status should be taken off the policy.

Insurance policies generated for business purposes should also be regularly reviewed to make sure the policy still offers adequate coverage to meet the needs of the company and includes the appropriate beneficiary information. With life happening so quickly, it can be easy to forget about keeping insurance policies up to date, however, major changes can have a profound impact on coverage and premiums. Be sure to conduct insurance audits often to ensure your policies are still meeting your needs. 

Contact us to see how we can help. 

Continue Reading

The 2019 budget is titled “Investing in the Middle Class. Here are the highlights from the 2019 Federal Budget.

2019 Federal Budget

The 2019 budget is titled “Investing in the Middle Class. Here are the highlights from the 2019 Federal Budget.

We’ve put together the key measures for:

  • Individuals and Families

  • Business Owners and Executives

  • Retirement and Retirees

  • Farmers and Fishers

Individuals & Families

Home Buyers’ Plan

Currently, the Home Buyers’ Plan allows first time home buyers to withdraw $25,000 from their Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP), the budget proposes an increase this to $35,000.

First Time Home Buyer Incentive

The Incentive is to provide eligible first-time home buyers with shared equity funding of 5% or 10% of their home purchase price through Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC).

To be eligible:

  • Household income is less than $120,000.

  • There is a cap of no more than 4 times the applicant’s annual income where the mortgage value plus the CMHC loan doesn’t exceed $480,000.

The buyer must pay back CMHC when the property is sold, however details about the dollar amount payable is unclear. There will be further details released later this year.

Canada Training Benefit

A refundable training tax credit to provide up to half eligible tuition and fees associated with training. Eligible individuals will accumulate $250 per year in a notional account to a maximum of $5,000 over a lifetime.

Canadian Drug Agency

National Pharmacare program to help provinces and territories on bulk drug purchases and negotiate better prices for prescription medicine. According to the budget, the goal is to make “prescription drugs affordable for all Canadians.”

Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP)

The budget proposes to remove the limitation on the period that a RDSP may remain open after a beneficiary becomes ineligible for the disability tax credit. (DTC) and the requirement for medical certification for the DTC in the future in order for the plan to remain open.

This is a positive change for individuals in the disability community and the proposed measures will apply after 2020.

Business Owners and Executives

Intergenerational Business Transfer

The government will continue consultations with farmers, fishes and other business owners throughout 2019 to develop new proposals to facilitate the intergenerational transfers of businesses.

Employee Stock Options

The introduction of a $200,000 annual cap on employee stock option grants (based on Fair market value) that may receive preferential tax treatment for employees of “large, long-established, mature firms.” More details will be released before this summer.

Retirement and Retirees

Additional types of Annuities under Registered Plans

For certain registered plans, two new types of annuities will be introduced to address longevity risk and providing flexibility: Advanced Life Deferred Annuity and Variable Payment Life Annuity.

This will allow retirees to keep more savings tax-free until later in retirement.

Advanced Life Deferred Annuity (ALDA): An annuity whose commencement can be deferred until age 85. It limits the amount that would be subject to the RRIF minimum, and it also pushes off the time period to just short of age 85.

Variable Payment Life Annuity (VPLA): Permit Pooled Retirement Pension Plans (PRPP) and defined contribution Registered Retirement Plans (RPP) to provide a VPLA to members directly from the plan. A VPLA will provide payments that vary based on the investment performance of the underlying annuities fund and on the mortality experience of VPLA annuitants.

Farmers and Fishers

Small Business Deduction

Farming/Fishing will be entitled to claim a small business deduction on income from sales to any arm’s length purchaser. Producers will be able to market their grain and livestock to the purchaser that makes the most business sense without worrying about potential income tax issues. This measure will apply retroactive to any taxation years that began after March 21, 2016.

To learn how the budget affects you, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Continue Reading

The big news from the Manitoba Budget today was the reduction of the Provincial Sales Tax (PST) from 8% to 7%

The big news from the Manitoba Budget was the reduction of the Provincial Sales Tax (PST) from 8% to 7%. The change will come into effect July 1st, 2019.

According to the Manitoba.ca website:

“This will save families $30 when buying furniture worth $3,000, $350 when buying a car or truck for $35,000 or $1,500 when buying a new home for $300,000.”

Also, this Provincial Sales tax will NOT be applied to the upcoming Federal Carbon Tax to be levied on natural gas and coal. This is estimated to save Manitoba families and businesses $3.6 million in 2019/2020.

For business, the focus is on business growth. Some initiatives include:

  • Film and Video Production Tax Credit is made permanent with no fixed expiry date. The amount allocated will increase from $16 million to $31.5 million.

  • Cultural Industries Printing Tax Credit is extended by one year to December 31, 2020. In addition, the annual maximum tax credit claim is capped at $1.1 million per taxpayer. This measure is effective for qualified expenditures as of the 2019 tax year.

  • To grow the book publishing industry, the Book Publishing Tax Credit is extended for five years to December 31, 2024.

  • To support individuals and corporations who acquire equity capital in eligible Manitoba enterprises, the Small Business Venture Capital Tax Credit is extended for three years to December 31, 2022.

The full Manitoba budget can be found at Manitoba.ca

Continue Reading

If you want to see how much tax you can save contributing to your RRSP for the 2018 tax filing year, enter your details!

RRSP Deadline: March 1, 2019

This is the deadline for contributing to your Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) for the 2018 tax filing year. You generally have 60 days within the new calendar year to make RRSP contributions that can be applied to lowering your taxes for the previous year.

If you want to see how much tax you can save, enter your details below!

Continue Reading

The biggest changes include: The increase in the amount of income eligible for the small business deduction, The increase in Basic Personal Amount, Carbon tax

Manitoba Finance Minister Cameron Friesen delivered the province’s 2018 budget update on March 12, 2018. The budget anticipates a surplus of $521 million for 2018 to 2019.

Corporate and personal tax rates remain unchanged.

The biggest changes are:

●     The increase in the amount of income eligible for the small business deduction.

●     The increase in Basic Personal Amount

●     Carbon tax

Corporation changes

  • Small Business Deduction Limit Increased – Although there were no announcements about changes to the province’s corporate tax rate, it does increase the small business income limit eligible from $450,000 to $500,0000 effective January 1, 2019.
  • Child Care Centre Development Tax Credit – A new refundable corporation income tax credit to encourage the creation of licensed child care centres in workplaces. The credit will be a total benefit of $10,000 per new infant/preschool space created, claimable over 5 years. (This is for corporations that are not primarily engaged in child care services.)
  • Small Business Venture Capital Tax Credit – The 45% investment tax credit is intended to promote the acquisition of equity capital in emerging enterprises that require larger amount of capital. Effective, March 12, 2018 the minimum investment is lowered to $10,000 (from $20,000) and the elimination off the $15 million revenue cap on the size of an eligible corporation.

Personal tax changes

  • Basic Personal Amount – The Basic Personal Amount will be increased by $1,010 each year for 2019 and 2020 (approximately 10% per year) resulting in additional savings of $109 for 2019 and $218 for 2020 or “$2,020 by 2020”.
  • Primary Caregiver Tax Credit – Effective immediately, the budget implements a flat $1,400 Primary Caregiver Tax Credit available to all eligible caregivers.
  • Education Property Tax Credit – Effective January 1, 2019, the calculation of the education property tax credit will be based on actual school taxes and the $250 deductible will be eliminated.
  • Tobacco Tax – Effective March 12, 2018, there will be an increase to the tobacco tax rate for fine-cut tobacco to 45¢ per gram (from 28.5¢ per gram)
  • Carbon Tax – Effective September 1, 2018, there will be an imposed tax of $25 per tonne of greenhouse gas emissions. This new provincial carbon regime will apply to gas, liquid, solid fuels intended for combustion.

Carbon Tax Rates by Select Fuel Type (2018-2022)

To learn how these changes will affect you, please don’t hesitate to contact us. 

Continue Reading

It's that time of year again, when many of us sit down to complete our income tax return and hope that we have done enough preparation to ensure a smooth and speedy process. Unfortunately, there are a number of complexities that can cause us problems - here are a few of the most common issues experienced by individuals when submitting their tax returns

It’s that time of year again, when many of us sit down to complete our income tax return and hope that we have done enough preparation to ensure a smooth and speedy process. Unfortunately, there are a number of complexities that can cause us problems – here are a few of the most common issues experienced by individuals when submitting their tax returns:

Medical Expenses

Expenses relating to medical expenses such as prescriptions, dentures and many more can be claimed for a non-refundable tax credit. You should also be aware that you can claim for yourself, your spouse or common law partner and any dependent children under the age of 18. You can also claim for certain other individuals whom you can clearly evidence are dependent on you (and the list of such individuals has recently been widened and can include grandparents, uncles, aunts, nieces and nephews).

 

Charitable Donations

You can claim tax credits for qualifying charitable donations that you made in 2017, though they are subject to an annual limit at 75% of your net income. You may also be eligible for a provisional donation tax credit. To receive such credits, you must supply a charitable donation receipt as evidence of your donation.

What’s more, there is a new formula for calculating the federal tax credit, depending on the value of donations. This is as follows:

1.    15% of the first $200 of donations

2.    33% of donations equal to the lesser of the amount of taxable income over $202,800 or the amount of donations over $200

3.    29% of total donations not included in the two stages above.

Public Transit Pass

Although this credit ended in the 2017 federal budget, it can still be claimed for the time period of January 1 – June 30, 2017. There are a range of eligible passes, including passes allowing unlimited travel within Canada, short term passes allowing unlimited travel for five days of which at least 20 days’ worth are purchased during a 28 day period and electronic payment cards.

 

Interest Expense and carrying charges

Interest on money borrowed to earn business or investment income is generally deductible, however interest expenses incurred on money borrowed to generate a capital gain is not tax deductible.

 

Carry forward information

Take note of the notice of assessment from your previous year’s tax return as it will contain important information that will apply to the submission of your current year’s return, such as your RRSP contribution limit and any carry-forward amounts.

Remember that you may be required to submit receipts alongside your electronic return at a later date, as requested by the CRA.

 

Child care expenses

Child care expenses include payments made to caregivers, nursery schools, day care centres and camps and other similar institutions. The deduction is usually best claimed by the lower earning spouse.

The deduction is the lesser of the following three:

·      the total qualifying child care expenses which have been incurred

·      $8,000 for each child under the age of 7, as well as $5,000 for each child between 6 and 16 and $11,000 for each child for whom the taxpayer has claimed the disability tax credit.

·      two thirds of the income earned by the individual making the claim.

If you owe money when your income tax return is complete, the only way to delay payment is to delay the filing until the April 30th deadline. Alternatively, if CRA owes you money, then file as early as possible.

Continue Reading