204-326-6088 [email protected]

investment

The 2019 budget is titled “Investing in the Middle Class. Here are the highlights from the 2019 Federal Budget.

2019 Federal Budget

The 2019 budget is titled “Investing in the Middle Class. Here are the highlights from the 2019 Federal Budget.

We’ve put together the key measures for:

  • Individuals and Families

  • Business Owners and Executives

  • Retirement and Retirees

  • Farmers and Fishers

Individuals & Families

Home Buyers’ Plan

Currently, the Home Buyers’ Plan allows first time home buyers to withdraw $25,000 from their Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP), the budget proposes an increase this to $35,000.

First Time Home Buyer Incentive

The Incentive is to provide eligible first-time home buyers with shared equity funding of 5% or 10% of their home purchase price through Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC).

To be eligible:

  • Household income is less than $120,000.

  • There is a cap of no more than 4 times the applicant’s annual income where the mortgage value plus the CMHC loan doesn’t exceed $480,000.

The buyer must pay back CMHC when the property is sold, however details about the dollar amount payable is unclear. There will be further details released later this year.

Canada Training Benefit

A refundable training tax credit to provide up to half eligible tuition and fees associated with training. Eligible individuals will accumulate $250 per year in a notional account to a maximum of $5,000 over a lifetime.

Canadian Drug Agency

National Pharmacare program to help provinces and territories on bulk drug purchases and negotiate better prices for prescription medicine. According to the budget, the goal is to make “prescription drugs affordable for all Canadians.”

Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP)

The budget proposes to remove the limitation on the period that a RDSP may remain open after a beneficiary becomes ineligible for the disability tax credit. (DTC) and the requirement for medical certification for the DTC in the future in order for the plan to remain open.

This is a positive change for individuals in the disability community and the proposed measures will apply after 2020.

Business Owners and Executives

Intergenerational Business Transfer

The government will continue consultations with farmers, fishes and other business owners throughout 2019 to develop new proposals to facilitate the intergenerational transfers of businesses.

Employee Stock Options

The introduction of a $200,000 annual cap on employee stock option grants (based on Fair market value) that may receive preferential tax treatment for employees of “large, long-established, mature firms.” More details will be released before this summer.

Retirement and Retirees

Additional types of Annuities under Registered Plans

For certain registered plans, two new types of annuities will be introduced to address longevity risk and providing flexibility: Advanced Life Deferred Annuity and Variable Payment Life Annuity.

This will allow retirees to keep more savings tax-free until later in retirement.

Advanced Life Deferred Annuity (ALDA): An annuity whose commencement can be deferred until age 85. It limits the amount that would be subject to the RRIF minimum, and it also pushes off the time period to just short of age 85.

Variable Payment Life Annuity (VPLA): Permit Pooled Retirement Pension Plans (PRPP) and defined contribution Registered Retirement Plans (RPP) to provide a VPLA to members directly from the plan. A VPLA will provide payments that vary based on the investment performance of the underlying annuities fund and on the mortality experience of VPLA annuitants.

Farmers and Fishers

Small Business Deduction

Farming/Fishing will be entitled to claim a small business deduction on income from sales to any arm’s length purchaser. Producers will be able to market their grain and livestock to the purchaser that makes the most business sense without worrying about potential income tax issues. This measure will apply retroactive to any taxation years that began after March 21, 2016.

To learn how the budget affects you, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Continue Reading

The big news from the Manitoba Budget today was the reduction of the Provincial Sales Tax (PST) from 8% to 7%

The big news from the Manitoba Budget was the reduction of the Provincial Sales Tax (PST) from 8% to 7%. The change will come into effect July 1st, 2019.

According to the Manitoba.ca website:

“This will save families $30 when buying furniture worth $3,000, $350 when buying a car or truck for $35,000 or $1,500 when buying a new home for $300,000.”

Also, this Provincial Sales tax will NOT be applied to the upcoming Federal Carbon Tax to be levied on natural gas and coal. This is estimated to save Manitoba families and businesses $3.6 million in 2019/2020.

For business, the focus is on business growth. Some initiatives include:

  • Film and Video Production Tax Credit is made permanent with no fixed expiry date. The amount allocated will increase from $16 million to $31.5 million.

  • Cultural Industries Printing Tax Credit is extended by one year to December 31, 2020. In addition, the annual maximum tax credit claim is capped at $1.1 million per taxpayer. This measure is effective for qualified expenditures as of the 2019 tax year.

  • To grow the book publishing industry, the Book Publishing Tax Credit is extended for five years to December 31, 2024.

  • To support individuals and corporations who acquire equity capital in eligible Manitoba enterprises, the Small Business Venture Capital Tax Credit is extended for three years to December 31, 2022.

The full Manitoba budget can be found at Manitoba.ca

Continue Reading

If you want to see how much tax you can save contributing to your RRSP for the 2018 tax filing year, enter your details!

RRSP Deadline: March 1, 2019

This is the deadline for contributing to your Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) for the 2018 tax filing year. You generally have 60 days within the new calendar year to make RRSP contributions that can be applied to lowering your taxes for the previous year.

If you want to see how much tax you can save, enter your details below!

Continue Reading

Morneau’s federal budget announced earlier this year informed us how the government will treat passive income in a Canadian Controlled Private Corporation. (CCPC) The government’s main concern was that under the current rules a “tax deferral advantage” exists since tax on active business income is usually lower than the top personal marginal tax rate. Therefore if the corporate funds were invested for a long period of time, shareholders might end up with more after-tax amount than if it was invested personally.

Morneau’s federal budget announced earlier this year informed us how the government will treat passive income in a Canadian Controlled Private Corporation. (CCPC) The government’s main concern was that under the current rules a “tax deferral advantage” exists since tax on active business income is usually lower than the top personal marginal tax rate. Therefore if the corporate funds were invested for a long period of time, shareholders might end up with more after-tax amount than if it was invested personally.

 

Limiting Access to the Small Business Tax Rate

A key objective of the budget is to decrease the small business limit for CCPCs with a set threshold of income generated from passive investments. This will apply to CCPCs with between $50,000 and $150,000 of investment income. It reduces the small business deduction by $5 for each $1 of investment income which falls over the threshold of $50,000 (also known as the adjusted aggregate investment income). This new regulation will go hand in hand with the current business limit reduction for taxable capital.

 

The time to act is now, since these changes will be effective January 1, 2019, a discussion and plan should be prioritized now, since 2018 will be the “prior year” of 2019. To avoid the reduction of income eligible for the small business tax rate, business owners need to minimize or keep the amount below $50,000 of the “adjusted aggregate investment income” (AAII) in 2018.

 

We’ve listed some solutions on how to do this:

 

1)   Corporate Owned Insurance: Exempt life insurance does not produce passive investment income unless there is a disposition. Put a portion of the corporation’s passive investments into a life insurance policy and reduce passive investment income and limit the erosion of the small business limit. Insurance concepts:

●     Insured retirement program: Provide additional retirement funding through transferring excess corporate funds into whole life or universal life insurance. The funds inside the policy grow “tax free” to create significant cash value. At some point when there is a need for cash, the policy is pledged as collateral for a bank loan. The bank loan doesn’t need to be repaid until the life insured dies and the death benefit is used to repay the loan. Any remaining death benefit is paid out.

●     Estate bond: Transfer corporate wealth to the future generation by utilizing whole life or universal life insurance. Essentially replace taxable investment with life insurance, increase funds for a future generation upon death, reduce tax and create a strategy to move funds out of the corporation tax free (through the Capital Dividend Account.)

●     Corporate held Critical Illness with Return of Premium: Purchase corporate owned critical illness, since it doesn’t produce any investment income.

 

2)   Pay enough salary/dividends to maximize RRSP and TFSA Contributions: A salary of $145,722 will allow the max 2018 RRSP contribution is $26,230 (18% of $145,722). Make sure you also pay enough salary/dividend to maximize your annual $5,500 TFSA contribution.

3)   Individual Pension Plan (IPP): The corporation contributes to the IPP and income earned in the IPP doesn’t belong to the corporation. This should only be considered when the AAII is over $50,000.

4)   Deferred Capital Gains: Capital gains are 50% taxable and are only 50% included in the AAII.

 

Talk to us, we can help you figure out the best solution for your unique situation.

 

Continue Reading

Inheriting an unexpected, or even an anticipated, lump sum can fill you with mixed emotions – if your emotional attachment to the individual who has passed away was strong then you are likely to be grieving and the thought of how to handle your new-found wealth can be overwhelming and confusing but also exciting. One of the best pieces of advice in this situation is to give yourself some time before making any binding financial decisions. The temptation to quickly put the money to so-called ‘good use’ or to rush out and spend it can be strong but you must allow the news to sink in and also take some time to consider your options before you embark on the process of dealing with the inheritance. In the short term, put the money away in a high interest savings account and take time to research and think carefully about your financial goals and objectives and how this inheritance can help you to secure and maximize your financial future in the best way.

How to Make the Best of Inheritance Planning

Inheriting an unexpected, or even an anticipated, lump sum can fill you with mixed emotions – if your emotional attachment to the individual who has passed away was strong then you are likely to be grieving and the thought of how to handle your new-found wealth can be overwhelming and confusing but also exciting. One of the best pieces of advice in this situation is to give yourself some time before making any binding financial decisions. The temptation to quickly put the money to so-called ‘good use’ or to rush out and spend it can be strong but you must allow the news to sink in and also take some time to consider your options before you embark on the process of dealing with the inheritance. In the short term, put the money away in a high interest savings account and take time to research and think carefully about your financial goals and objectives and how this inheritance can help you to secure and maximise your financial future in the best way.

Although there is no one-size-fits-all approach to dealing with larger sums of money, here are some useful ideas of where to start.

Reduce your debt burden

If you have significant or high-interest debts, one of the safest options of all is paying this debt down. Not only will you achieve a guaranteed after-tax rate of return of your current interest rate, it can also add to your feeling of financial security and potentially offer you a more consistent financial picture. Debt often carries with it a significant interest rate – particularly on credit cards and overdrafts for example – so in many cases, eliminating this burden should be considered as one of your main priorities.

However, you may like to take careful note of the option below regarding investing the money instead as much depends on the prevailing interest rates and, of course, your appetite for risk, as you may well find an investment option with a potentially higher return more attractive.

Make investments

A particularly effective way of investing an inheritance is to add it to your retirement savings – especially if your nest egg is not looking quite as healthy as it should due to missed savings years for example. Those with lower or less reliable incomes should look upon this option as a great choice in particular.

Be charitable

After considering your own future financial needs, giving some of your wealth away to either charities or to family and friends is a good option to share out some of your inheritance to those who could benefit from it. What’s more, donating to charity can also offer you some tax breaks which may reduce your overall tax burden.

Many individuals see this philanthropic route as offering them the opportunity to do something meaningful and rewarding with their wealth and contributing towards their own sense of moral duty and emotional wellbeing.

Make a spending plan

Of course, you are likely to be keen to spend some of your wealth on yourself and your family, particularly if your financial situation means that you have previously had to be more careful and prudent with money than you would have liked. A great way to do this is to create a spending plan so that you can enjoy the benefits of spending, without it significantly eating into money set aside for your financial planning goals. You could, perhaps, aim to set aside 10% of the inheritance just for yourself and loved ones to enjoy. The proportion will naturally depend on your circumstances but, in principle, it’s a great idea as it allows you to balance sensible saving and investments with some short-term enjoyment of your wealth.

Talk to us, we can help.

Continue Reading